About Me

Tuesday, February 8, 2011

Youth and Young Womanhood.

My blog is not a big producer of comments. I try really hard to keep any insecurities I have about this on lock down. But for this post people, I am begging for some comments. I genuinely want to know your stories on this subject.

I was having a conversation with a man who has only daughters and we ended up talking about how he handled his daughters having boyfriends. And I mentioned that my dad never did the whole "cleaning his shotgun" routine to intimidate potential romantic prospects.

This made me think about time I spent with my dad as a girl.

I am fairly certain that our interactions were on par with other fathers and daughters. Building furniture for my Barbies, playing with the vice grip in the garage while he built "stuff,"  learning how to drive tractors, removing old rusty nails from old rotted boards, helping him catch piglets so he could castrate them, playing fox and the hound in the snow, cleaning and filing at his office, and hiking, lots of hiking. That's what y'all did.... right?  What I am thinking is......maybe not. My experiences might be a little different.

So I am asking, that you go down to my little comment section and tell me:

What did you do with your dad (or step dad or grandpa or uncle or whatever)?

SPECIAL NOTE TO MY SISTERS: YOU ARE NOT EXEMPT FROM THIS REQUEST!

19 comments:

  1. Ok--here goes.
    My Dad and I are cool. When I was younger, he was the very-strict-over-protective-elder-father. Looking back-- a very good Dad. And even in the truth his kind are hard to find these days. He worked with me in service a lot, studied with me. When I was really young he played catch and ran with me. The boy he always wanted. Then he says I turned into a girl when I hit 12. Way things go, I guess. As I've gotten older, he's been the good advice and foundation to make good decisions. He taught me to drive at 13 in the park. He took us (and by us I mean all the kids in the cong) to the park at least twice a month. We LOVED it and still talk about it. He got me a credit card at 16 and taught me how to manage my money well. He sent me to Bethal for a surprise when I was 17 with my cousins and Kyle. He's my go to man to get hikes anc cong picnics and bible game nights together. He hated any guy that looked at me, forget wanted to be my friend. He was the kind of Dad that other parents would say " If Cecil let's Kristen go ( to the party, or movies or whatever) then you can go. It MUST be fine if he lets her go". He was the kind of Dad that my guy friends respected and were scared of. And that my girlfriends would talk to. ANd the kind of Dad I could trust to always be there.
    Yep a fabulous Dad.

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  2. ANother thought--He is the reason why my standards are so high for my potiential husband. And why none have met that bar yet.

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  3. We did hikes too. Also, we helped him lay brick when we were building our house. Camping, biking, kayaking, time out on the boat! So many good memories. Ahh to be a kid again when we actually had time to do things!

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  4. As the Father of daughters, what I recall with wonderful memories, is reading bedtime stories, sometimes falling asleep before they did, sorry, swimming and teaching them to take those first few strokes on their own, picking wild flowers on May day for their Mother and Grandmother,helping them steady themselves as they learned to ride their bikes, the whole family having a meal together and listening to their stories of their day at school, seeing them playing with their cousins, admiring their art work, buying her a raincoat, dancing with her to Imagine and watching her grow into a wonderful, smart, creative and loving young woman whose blogs, make me think, laugh and cry, sometimes all at the same time.

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  5. Sweet comment daddy!...not very anonamous! Oh the memories! Megs I remember most of the same stuff...minus the chasing pigs thing...thank god! Ew. But bedtime stories, me being a huge wimp I usually didn't last long in the snow but remember playing in it with dad a lot. Playing in the yard before dinner in the summer and spring, and getting ice cream after sometimes. Bike rides, hikes, adventures in the woods...even if it was sometimes just to accompany to go cut wood. Riding on his lap or on the side of the gray tractor while he drove it. Mostly outdoorsy stuff. Stuff I wish we got to continue doing as we grow up, but rarely have time for.

    ReplyDelete
  6. First of all - thanks for all the comments so far. Several of them have made me totally teary eyed. KEEP THEM COMING! Secondly here are comments that were emailed to me from Becca. Long, totally worth the read:

    Although we didn't have the whole farm-related experience (castrating pigs, for example), we did a lot with Dad that concerned stuff he did. When we were little and he did gutters, we played on top of his semi semi truck. (Haha. Why aren't you laughing?) And we built snow forts. And he taught me to ride my bike next to the cornfield behind our house. We did do a lot exploring with him. I remember once we were walking (what seemed like a very far way) in the woods and came to a ditch. He literally threw us across because we were too small to jump ourselves. He misjudged with one of us, though, and we landed partially in the water. I don't remember if it was me or Brie. But the point is, we spent lots of time doing outdoorsey things (like catching snakes. Did I ever tell you that the reason I'm fascinated with snakes is because he used to catch them and have us hold them when we were like 3?)

    We did a lot with him while we got older, too. We helped build our house in NM. We would occasionally watch/help him while he did stuff fixing the cars or computers. We hiked in the mountains with him. He taught us to drive tractors. Big ones when we were very young, and then when we didn't have any more big ones, we did have a little lawn mower sized one that we drove around. We went fishing with him. He taught us how to row properly and drive a motor boat, and water ski and knee board and swim and snorkel and scuba dive. He helped us take care of stranded baby animals, and taught us a respect for living creatures - not to be cruel or kill for fun. He taught us to work hard and get things done the right way, not taking shortcuts that cut quality. He also taught us how to play well, to be competitive without being a sore loser or winner. And he taught - and is still teaching - us how to think. What's right and wrong, what proper and not.

    We haven't gotten to the whole dating thing yet, but I am sure he will be pretty protective. Any prospective young man who comes knocking will likely have many long conversations on our back porch.

    ReplyDelete
  7. My Pops did awesome stuff with us too!
    A few specific ones are setting the living room up like a movie theater. The kitchen was set up like the snack stand and he acted like he didn't know us. We called him Dad and he said "Dad? Not me. I am the usher here at the movies".
    Another time he had us get all ready for school and just before we walked out the door he told us we were skipping school and hitting the zoo for the day! It totally rocked.
    He would take us out early and we would go to the movies.
    He was the best dad! I hope I can be as awesome for Liam as he was for me :)

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  8. Hey Meghaun! My daddy!!! He really is the best. As a kid tho, he was VERY over protective. He was raised in Chicago and had a hard childhood. That being said, we spent alot of time with him because he didnt want us anywhere else. Not really talking or building or playing, but just being with him. Watching TV with him (wrestling and western movies), we worked with him (we had a cleaning business) and listened to his stories and the sound of him singing his music (old R & B).

    He read to us almost every night from the Book of Bible Stories or Young People Ask. He would let us go outside play and take a walk (me and my bros) but he was always watching. I remember when we were younger he would let me, Joe & Matt walk to A & W for ice cream or food, but he would drive by every 5 minutes. So basically he drove behind us the entire way. Now he wasn't our friend as a child.

    He LOVED to tell us, "I am not your friend. I'm your daddy." So he laid down the law and did not play with us. He expected respect at all times. But altho that was hard at times, I totally respect and love the way we were raised. We may not know how to swim or skate, but by his example, we learned what hard work and responsibility were, we learned what a real, loving marriage looked like. Our parents were always loving toward each other.

    We are so close to our dad now. We truly are best friends with him now since we are older. He texts or calls us daily and we must see him at least weekly. Sometimes he may appear intimidating but he for sure is the most gentle, loving father who we absolutely ADORE!!!!!

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  9. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  10. ok so i just have to list them...
    -outdoorsy stuff like hiking, playing catch, etc
    -our bedtime routine when Margaux & I were young
    -building the barn
    -many many vacations
    -golfing
    -special trips we took without my sisters (hiking, trips to visit family)
    -bbq chicken & sweet potato Wednesdays.

    even though this didnt involve me I loved that when we still lived on the farm dad ran almost every morning (super super early)down the dirt road..i liked knowing thats what he was doing..&now i like running & feel like i can do it because he did it every morning (not that i do it as regularly or can run as far as he could)

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  11. I didn't have a Dad! WAA! But I DID help Charles make do some tile mosaic crap one time.
    *Doo doo doo* (that's me whistling.) Awkward.

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  12. I like to watch you when you sleep.



    Is that creepy enough? Just wanna see if you'll delete it. I'm betting you don't.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Aw Cyd! I bet your dad was really great. I am betting this because of the phrase "the apple doesn't fall far from the tree." Also, did the tile mosaic turn out pretty at least?

    And your bet is correct. Funny trumps creepy.

    ReplyDelete
  14. So I will throw a little about my daddy in the mix...
    He was a musician and I never knew if a song I heard on the radio was one of his covers or if he really wrote the song. I always used to ask him..."dad? Did you write that song? Cause I'm sure I heard it on the radio".
    Dad and I did EVERYTHING together. We would jump in his baby blue Ford truck and go to the saw shop (he was a lumberjack after leaving coming back into the truth and leaving the whole sex/drugs/rock n' roll thing). He used to write pages of "scribble" on a yellow pad and every line would be an amazing line from a song in his head.
    We would both get home around 3:30 in the afternoon and spend the next few hours talking about our day. He was an amazing story teller...
    He would come home with a gash on his arm and I'd ask him how he got it (probably from a tree limb) and he'd tell me about the "chipawa" woman that come after him with a knife or the bear - he never backed down. I actually have enough stories to fill a book from him.
    Two of my favorites:
    When he was living the "rock n' roll" lifestyle and had to climb out a window from a bathroom of a "girlfriend" and run down the street wearing nothing but her "pink peddle pushers" when her mom came home.
    And, when he was in the world he would hear Fire and Rain by James Taylor and the lyric would come on "won't you look down upon me Jesus, you gotta help me make a stand"...he would always cry because he knew he hadn't made a stand for the truth.
    AND so...I can't hear that one without crying now because I lost him 4 years ago...
    So no Bob Dylan or James Taylor or Strawberry Fields or Blue Eye's Crying in the Rain for me for a while til I see him again.

    ReplyDelete
  15. So I will throw a little about my daddy in the mix...
    He was a musician and I never knew if a song I heard on the radio was one of his covers or if he really wrote the song. I always used to ask him..."dad? Did you write that song? Cause I'm sure I heard it on the radio".
    Dad and I did EVERYTHING together. We would jump in his baby blue Ford truck and go to the saw shop (he was a lumberjack after leaving coming back into the truth and leaving the whole sex/drugs/rock n' roll thing). He used to write pages of "scribble" on a yellow pad and every line would be an amazing line from a song in his head.
    We would both get home around 3:30 in the afternoon and spend the next few hours talking about our day. He was an amazing story teller...
    He would come home with a gash on his arm and I'd ask him how he got it (probably from a tree limb) and he'd tell me about the "chipawa" woman that come after him with a knife or the bear - he never backed down. I actually have enough stories to fill a book from him.
    Two of my favorites:
    When he was living the "rock n' roll" lifestyle and had to climb out a window from a bathroom of a "girlfriend" and run down the street wearing nothing but her "pink peddle pushers" when her mom came home.
    And, when he was in the world he would hear Fire and Rain by James Taylor and the lyric would come on "won't you look down upon me Jesus, you gotta help me make a stand"...he would always cry because he knew he hadn't made a stand for the truth.
    AND so...I can't hear that one without crying now because I lost him 4 years ago...
    So no Bob Dylan or James Taylor or Strawberry Fields or Blue Eye's Crying in the Rain for me for a while til I see him again.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Sweet comment daddy!...not very anonamous! Oh the memories! Megs I remember most of the same stuff...minus the chasing pigs thing...thank god! Ew. But bedtime stories, me being a huge wimp I usually didn't last long in the snow but remember playing in it with dad a lot. Playing in the yard before dinner in the summer and spring, and getting ice cream after sometimes. Bike rides, hikes, adventures in the woods...even if it was sometimes just to accompany to go cut wood. Riding on his lap or on the side of the gray tractor while he drove it. Mostly outdoorsy stuff. Stuff I wish we got to continue doing as we grow up, but rarely have time for.

    ReplyDelete
  17. First of all - thanks for all the comments so far. Several of them have made me totally teary eyed. KEEP THEM COMING! Secondly here are comments that were emailed to me from Becca. Long, totally worth the read:

    Although we didn't have the whole farm-related experience (castrating pigs, for example), we did a lot with Dad that concerned stuff he did. When we were little and he did gutters, we played on top of his semi semi truck. (Haha. Why aren't you laughing?) And we built snow forts. And he taught me to ride my bike next to the cornfield behind our house. We did do a lot exploring with him. I remember once we were walking (what seemed like a very far way) in the woods and came to a ditch. He literally threw us across because we were too small to jump ourselves. He misjudged with one of us, though, and we landed partially in the water. I don't remember if it was me or Brie. But the point is, we spent lots of time doing outdoorsey things (like catching snakes. Did I ever tell you that the reason I'm fascinated with snakes is because he used to catch them and have us hold them when we were like 3?)

    We did a lot with him while we got older, too. We helped build our house in NM. We would occasionally watch/help him while he did stuff fixing the cars or computers. We hiked in the mountains with him. He taught us to drive tractors. Big ones when we were very young, and then when we didn't have any more big ones, we did have a little lawn mower sized one that we drove around. We went fishing with him. He taught us how to row properly and drive a motor boat, and water ski and knee board and swim and snorkel and scuba dive. He helped us take care of stranded baby animals, and taught us a respect for living creatures - not to be cruel or kill for fun. He taught us to work hard and get things done the right way, not taking shortcuts that cut quality. He also taught us how to play well, to be competitive without being a sore loser or winner. And he taught - and is still teaching - us how to think. What's right and wrong, what proper and not.

    We haven't gotten to the whole dating thing yet, but I am sure he will be pretty protective. Any prospective young man who comes knocking will likely have many long conversations on our back porch.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Ok--here goes.
    My Dad and I are cool. When I was younger, he was the very-strict-over-protective-elder-father. Looking back-- a very good Dad. And even in the truth his kind are hard to find these days. He worked with me in service a lot, studied with me. When I was really young he played catch and ran with me. The boy he always wanted. Then he says I turned into a girl when I hit 12. Way things go, I guess. As I've gotten older, he's been the good advice and foundation to make good decisions. He taught me to drive at 13 in the park. He took us (and by us I mean all the kids in the cong) to the park at least twice a month. We LOVED it and still talk about it. He got me a credit card at 16 and taught me how to manage my money well. He sent me to Bethal for a surprise when I was 17 with my cousins and Kyle. He's my go to man to get hikes anc cong picnics and bible game nights together. He hated any guy that looked at me, forget wanted to be my friend. He was the kind of Dad that other parents would say " If Cecil let's Kristen go ( to the party, or movies or whatever) then you can go. It MUST be fine if he lets her go". He was the kind of Dad that my guy friends respected and were scared of. And that my girlfriends would talk to. ANd the kind of Dad I could trust to always be there.
    Yep a fabulous Dad.

    ReplyDelete
  19. My dad lived abroad when I was growing up (he still does). So I barely got to spend time with  him. But the one thing I remember is him telling me stories, especially mythological ones. He is the person who got me started on reading coz he totally has a love affair with literature.... 

    ReplyDelete